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KiKiKose Stéphane Maury

Date(s)

le 28 avril 2022

12h45
Lieu(x)
Ce kikikose aura lieu dans la salle de séminaire de l'IRBI et sur Teams

Epigenetics, phenotypic plasticity and adaptation to climate change: the case of trees

Ce mercredi 27 avril, nous recevons Stéphane Maury du LBLGC d'Orléans. Stéphane sera ensuite disponible l'après-midi pour parler de ses travaux. 

Résumé :
" Epigenetics is considered as a missing part of heritability since the information encoded in the nucleotide sequence of DNA remains insufficient to explain biological variation in all its complexity. Epigenetics corresponds to the processes affecting the expression of genes and/or the activity of transposable elements (TEs) without initially altering the DNA sequence. These processes are hereditary by mitosis (during development) and/or meiosis (across generations). The epigenetic diversity of plants thus appears as a new source of widened phenotypic variation, contributing to the adaptation of species to environmental changes and ensuring the yield and quality of domesticated species whose genetic diversity has been eroded by intense and directional genetic selection. Due to their fixed mode of life, wide ecological distribution, long lifespan and continuous development, trees have, during their evolution, developed many adaptations to sustain themselves in changing environments. Over the last decade, the epigenetic variability of trees has been the subject of pioneering work on certain tree species for which genomic resources were available and in particular in connection with their phenotypic changes in response to environmental constraints such as temperature or water availability (Sow et al, 2021). This work opens perspectives on the use of this new source of phenotypic variation in the context of the silvicultural management of natural or planted forests. Here we will discuss epigenetic variation at two scales: intra-individual and inter-individual before presenting possible applications (Kakoulidou et al, 2021)."